100 S. CHURTON ST.

100 S. CHURTON ST.

100
,
Hillsborough
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1920-1924
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
,
Local Historic District: 
National Register: 
Type: 
Use: 
,
,

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Last updated

  • Mon, 10/17/2016 - 7:56am by gary

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100
,
Hillsborough
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1920-1924
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
,
Local Historic District: 
National Register: 
Type: 
Use: 
,
,

 

Smith's Bar ~1900 - from the History of Orange County

The frame building on the southwest corner of Churton and King pictured above, home of "Smith's Bar" per the History of Orange County, was likely built around 1890; the 1888 Sanborn maps portrays this entire corner as empty, with the text "Ruins of Fire."

From "History of the Town of Hillsborough 1754-1966" - looking west from the intersection of Churton and King. 100 S. Churton is the frame building on the left with the clipped corner.

 

This building likely remained standing on this site until around 1920, when it was replaced with an Art Deco, brick version of same.

Still frame from H. Lee Waters film of Hillsborough, 1937, showing 100 S. Churton in the background.

1968 (Hillsborough, NC General Development Plan, 1968-1988)

From the National Register nomination:

This two-story commercial building has a clipped northeast corner to take advantage of its location at the prominent intersection of South Churton and West King streets. The building is two bays wide and one-bay deep with the same façade treatment given to the east and north elevations. The brick building is laid in a one- to-six common bond and has a flat roof behind a brick parapet with bands of header- and soldier-course bricks. There are thirty-six-light display windows at the first-floor level and grouped six-over-six wood-sash windows at the second-floor level, each with arched transoms composed of four three-light Craftsman-style windows in a segmental-arched brick surrounds. The corner entrance bay features a replacement one-light wood door with one-light sidelights and a wide transom with dentil molding. A three-part arched transom with three-light Craftsman-style windows is located above and slightly in front of the recessed entrance and has a segmental- arched brick surround. There is decorative mousetooth brickwork at the corners, a soldier course at the cornice and dividing the first and second floors, and double-hung windows with arched transoms and segmental-arched brick surrounds at the basement level of the east elevation, now largely obscured by the sidewalk.

07.31.2016 (G. Kueber)

As of 2016, the building is home to Eno Gallery.

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