ALEXANDER DICKSON HOUSE (NEW LOCATION)

DicksonHouse_1950s.jpgDicksonHouse_outbuilding_1960s.jpgdicksonhouse_aftermove.jpgDicksonHouse_071711.jpg

ALEXANDER DICKSON HOUSE (NEW LOCATION)

150
,
Hillsborough
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1790
/ Modified in
1983
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
Local Historic District: 
Type: 

This Federal style house was built ~1790 and was the property of Alexander Dickson when CSA General Johnson made it his headquarters for the largest surrender of the Civil War. Moved to downtown Hillsborough in 1983 to avoid demolition, and repurposed as a visitor's center.

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Last updated

  • Mon, 10/17/2016 - 2:05pm by gary

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150
,
Hillsborough
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1790
/ Modified in
1983
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
Local Historic District: 
Type: 

 

Dickson House, 1950s (Hillsborough, North Carolina General Development Plan, 1968-1988)

DicksonHouse_1950s.jpg

1950s

DicksonHouse_outbuilding_1960s.jpg

Outbuilding on original Dickson Farm, 1960s.

Plaque reads:

"General Johnston's Officer and Orderly Room

Here took place the discussions regarding terms of surrender by General Johnston, Confederate Secretary of War Breckinridge, Mr. Mallory, and Confederate Governor Vance. From here, General Johnston with his staff rode along the old Hillsboro-Durham Road April 27 to make his final surrender of his army to General Sherman."

The house was moved in 1982 to an empty lot at the corner of East King and South Cameron Streets.

dicksonhouse_aftermove.jpg

After move to downtown Hillsborough, 1982.

(Courtesy NCSU)

The original site is now a Wal-Mart. The restored house serves as the Hillsborough Visitor Center

This two-story, late-Georgian-style house was moved to its present site in 1983 from the junction of I- 85 and Highway 86, just outside of Hillsborough, and now serves as the Chamber of Commerce and Visitors Center. The side-gabled house is three bays wide and two bays deep with a rubble-stone foundation, beaded weatherboards, an exterior Flemish-bond brick chimney on a stone base in the left (east) gable, and a wood- shingled roof. It has nine-over-nine wood-sash windows on the first floor with six-over-six windows at the second-floor level. The raised six-panel door is sheltered by a reconstructed, full-width, shed-roofed porch supported by chamfered posts. There is a one-story, gabled ell at the left rear (southeast) with a combination of six-over-six and four-over-four wood-sash windows and a shed-roofed porch along its right (west) elevation that is supported by chamfered posts. A modern access ramp leads to an entrance on the left elevation of the rear ell. The interior, a three-room plan with a center-hall and enclosed staircase, retains much original fabric, including wainscot, doors, and mantels. The house became the property of Alexander Dickson around 1839. In 1865, General Joseph E. Johnston used the house as his temporary headquarters.

DicksonHouse_071711.jpg

07.11.2011 (G. Kueber)

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