PELICAN GUIDE WALKING TOUR

PELICAN GUIDE WALKING TOUR


Lucille Noell Dula put together a great little guide for Hillsborough in 1979, which was updated in 1989. It appears to be out of print now, although still available. She puts together a "Walking Tour" (although it would be quite a serious walk to do the whole thing,) focusing on the well-known houses of Hillsborough.

ORANGE COUNTY COURTHOUSE (1845)

104
,
Hillsborough
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1845
Architect/Designers: 
Builders: 
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
,
National Register: 
Type: 
Use: 

The fourth courthouse in this location, built in 1845, with a clock purportedly dating from the 1760s

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  • Fri, 08/05/2016 - 1:58pm by gary

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104
,
Hillsborough
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1845
Architect/Designers: 
Builders: 
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
,
National Register: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

(Courtesy University of North Carolina postcard collection.) Image c. 1910-1915

From the National Register nomination:

One of the earliest and most architecturally distinguished courthouses in North Carolina, this brick temple-form Greek Revival-style building was designed and built by John Berry, a well-known local architect and builder. The two-story building is three bays wide and five bays deep with a full portico with classical pediment and entablature supported by four fluted Doric columns. Such fine details as the Flemish-bond brick walls, wide cornice, twelve-over-twelve wood-sash windows with flat brick arches, keystones, and stone sills, and the central double-leaf door with fanlight, brick voussoirs, and keystone remain intact. There are four interior brick chimneys and the original two-stage cupola clock tower surmounts the building. The courthouse is at least the fourth on this site. The interior retains most of its original finish, including a pair of open-string Federal-style stairs with foliate brackets, turned balusters and newels and heavy molded handrails, four-panel doors, symmetrically molded frames with cornerblocks, and well-proportioned pilastered mantels. The upstairs courtroom was renovated in the 1880s.

"Very old courthouse in Hillsboro, North Carolina." Marion Post Wolcott, Farm Service Adminstration. December 1939. Retrieved from LOC.

Looking southeast, March 1983. (NCSHPO via Tom Campanella / builtbrooklyn.org)

A new Orange County Courthouse, directly to the south across East Margaret Lane, was built in the 1950s.

07.02.2016 (G. Kueber)

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THOMAS BURKE MARKER

street: ,
Hillsborough
NC
Built in
1939
Construction type: 

 

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  • Fri, 09/09/2016 - 12:21pm by gary

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street: ,
Hillsborough
NC
Built in
1939
Construction type: 

 

09.03.2016 (G. Kueber)

"Governor of N.C., was captured in Hillsboro by David Fanning and his Tories, Sept. 12, 1781, and taken to Charleston, S.C."

 

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William Churton Marker

NORWOOD LAW OFFICE

135
,
Hillsborough
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1790-1839
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
,
Local Historic District: 
National Register: 
Type: 
Use: 

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  • Fri, 08/12/2016 - 4:31pm by gary

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135
,
Hillsborough
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1790-1839
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
,
Local Historic District: 
National Register: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

Circa 1918

 

 

Norwood Law Office, which stands on its original site in the extreme southwest corner of Lot 2, is the only surviving of three offices shown on this lot on an 1839 map. The one-story, front-gabled, Federal-style building is constructed with a one-to-five common bond brick and has boxed eaves. The one-room building has nine-over-nine wood-sash windows with flat brick arches and operable wood shutters. There is a one-to-five common bond chimney in the rear (east) gable and the stone foundation has been covered with stucco on the right (south) elevation. A standing-seam metal roof has been replaced with wood shakes. A six-panel door on the west elevation, faces the Orange County Courthouse. The interior features a Federal-style mantel, brick hearth, and continuous wainscoting. The office may have originally belonged to Judge William Norwood who died in 1842. Local historians have noted that the office was occupied by Cadwalader Jones in the mid-nineteenth century, presumably through a lease as a deed conveying title to him is not known to exist. In 1866, attorney Richard Ashe sold the office to John Wall Norwood for 0. Norwood was a member of the General Assembly in 1858 and a state senator in 1872. The Orange County Commissioners purchased the building and used it as the Veteran's Administration office.

~1920 - looking southeast from the top of the courthouse (from "History of the Town of Hillsborough")

07.02.2016 (G. Kueber)

 

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WILLIAM COURTNEY'S YELLOW HOUSE

141
,
Hillsborough
NC
Built in
1801
/ Modified in
1983
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
Local Historic District: 
National Register: 
Type: 
Use: 

1801 house of William Courtney was used as Hillsborough's first telephone exchange in the early-to-mid-20th century.

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  • Mon, 10/17/2016 - 11:42am by gary

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141
,
Hillsborough
NC
Built in
1801
/ Modified in
1983
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
Local Historic District: 
National Register: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

1966 (General Development Plan for Hillsborough, NC 1968-1988)

From the National Register nomination:

This two-story, side-gabled, Georgian-style house stands on a hill high above King Street with a brick retaining wall at the sidewalk. The house was originally at street level, but the street was lowered some years ago. The center-hall-plan house is three bays wide and single-pile with a rubble-stone foundation, beaded weatherboards, nine-over-nine wood-sash windows on the first floor façade, four-over-six wood-sash windows on the side elevations, and replacement vinyl windows at the second floor. Exterior brick chimneys in each gable end are of Flemish-bond construction. The left (west) chimney is double-shouldered and the right (east) chimney has been encompassed by a two-story, shed-roofed addition on the right elevation. The six-panel door is sheltered by a replacement front-gabled porch, constructed in 1983, supported by grouped square columns on a rubble-stone foundation. There is a full-width, one-story, shed-roofed wing and a one-story, gabled ell at the left rear (northwest). A shed-roofed screened porch on square columns extends along the left elevation of the rear ell and there is a one-story, shed-roofed wing to the right of the ell.

William Courtney purchased the lots in 1777 from Ralph McNair. In a deed conveyed in 1801 from William Courtney, Jr. to his brother Joseph, the term "yellow house" is first used, implying that a house was on the property. Although the house has undergone several renovations, it retains fine paneling in the west parlor and one bedroom and a distinctive west parlor mantel. The house was also used as a telephone exchange according to the 1924 Sanborn map. The two-story, shed-roofed wing on the east elevation appears on the 1888 Sanborn map. No porch is shown on the map until 1905 when a full-width porch is shown. A wrap-around porch is shown on the 1924 and 1943 Sanborn maps. By 1973, the porch had been removed and a new porch, appropriate to the design of the historic building, was constructed in 1983.

 

Lucile Dula recounts more detail about this house's life as a telephone exchange (edited for clarity / copyedited)

"Although the Courtney House was once a tavern allegedly visited by Lord Cornwallis, it is best known as Hillsborough's first telephone office. In 1906, the Morris Telephone Company tried to rent a building here [in Hillsborough], but found it difficult; the townspeople were afraid the equipment might be struck by Iightning. Finally, Henry Murdock agreed to rent them a room in his home (the Courtney House), and his daughter, Mamie, became the first switchboard operator.

When she began her duties there were fifty patrons and she was paid fifteen dollars a month and given time off to attend church on Sundays. She liked to work and contmued as "Central" after her marriage to William A. Gordon. When her husband died in 1920, she had three children to support, but by then there were more telephones in Hillsborough and her salary was larger. The two sons graduated from the Univesity of North Carolina, and the daughter from Peace College.

"Miss Mamie" had only one serious illness while she was with the telephone company: appendicitis. She was in the hospital for thirty days, and the family manned the switchboard. Although she was seriously ill, she later said she never doubted she would recover, but almost everyone else was doubtful.

There are many stories about the ways "Central" served the people of Hillsborough. For many years there was no public water system, and the local 'bucket brigade' had to be alerted when there was a fire. There were also only a few officers, all of them with double duties, and they had to be summoned by Miss Mamie. Once when a number of people were seriously ill and several deaths occurred within a short time, she stayed at the switchboard for forty-two hours to provide emergency assistance and get messages to distant relatives.

Many World War II GIs learned, too, that Hillsborough's efficient telephone operator provided them with a lifeline home, Once she was up virtually all night when some local sailors arrived in California, forgot the time difference, and began to make calls after midnight Eastern Standard Time.

Miss Mamie left the switchboard in 1948 when Morris installed the dial system, but remained briefly to handle routine duties. When the townspeople presented her with a check -small by current standards- she said she had given less than she had received However, Htllsborough's subscnbers were grateful to an operator who rarely rang wrong numbers, made unlisted numbers unnecessary, and made prank/crank calls impossible. Today the old telephone office bears the name of William Courtney, a prominent early Quaker. However, to those who remember the voice that said, "Number, please," the house will always be the office of Mamie Gordon, 'Central' for forty-two years."

The telephone exchange didn't move far; the company constructed a building across the street (120 East King Street) from the Yellow House; that building remains in use today as a central (unmanned) switching station for CenturyLink, the local phone company as of 2016.

07.02.2016 (G. Kueber)

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DicksonHouse_1950s.jpgDicksonHouse_outbuilding_1960s.jpgdicksonhouse_aftermove.jpgDicksonHouse_071711.jpg

ALEXANDER DICKSON HOUSE (NEW LOCATION)

150
,
Hillsborough
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1790
/ Modified in
1983
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
Local Historic District: 
Type: 

This Federal style house was built ~1790 and was the property of Alexander Dickson when CSA General Johnson made it his headquarters for the largest surrender of the Civil War. Moved to downtown Hillsborough in 1983 to avoid demolition, and repurposed as a visitor's center.

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  • Mon, 10/17/2016 - 2:05pm by gary

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150
,
Hillsborough
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1790
/ Modified in
1983
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
Local Historic District: 
Type: 

 

Dickson House, 1950s (Hillsborough, North Carolina General Development Plan, 1968-1988)

DicksonHouse_1950s.jpg

1950s

DicksonHouse_outbuilding_1960s.jpg

Outbuilding on original Dickson Farm, 1960s.

Plaque reads:

"General Johnston's Officer and Orderly Room

Here took place the discussions regarding terms of surrender by General Johnston, Confederate Secretary of War Breckinridge, Mr. Mallory, and Confederate Governor Vance. From here, General Johnston with his staff rode along the old Hillsboro-Durham Road April 27 to make his final surrender of his army to General Sherman."

The house was moved in 1982 to an empty lot at the corner of East King and South Cameron Streets.

dicksonhouse_aftermove.jpg

After move to downtown Hillsborough, 1982.

(Courtesy NCSU)

The original site is now a Wal-Mart. The restored house serves as the Hillsborough Visitor Center

This two-story, late-Georgian-style house was moved to its present site in 1983 from the junction of I- 85 and Highway 86, just outside of Hillsborough, and now serves as the Chamber of Commerce and Visitors Center. The side-gabled house is three bays wide and two bays deep with a rubble-stone foundation, beaded weatherboards, an exterior Flemish-bond brick chimney on a stone base in the left (east) gable, and a wood- shingled roof. It has nine-over-nine wood-sash windows on the first floor with six-over-six windows at the second-floor level. The raised six-panel door is sheltered by a reconstructed, full-width, shed-roofed porch supported by chamfered posts. There is a one-story, gabled ell at the left rear (southeast) with a combination of six-over-six and four-over-four wood-sash windows and a shed-roofed porch along its right (west) elevation that is supported by chamfered posts. A modern access ramp leads to an entrance on the left elevation of the rear ell. The interior, a three-room plan with a center-hall and enclosed staircase, retains much original fabric, including wainscot, doors, and mantels. The house became the property of Alexander Dickson around 1839. In 1865, General Joseph E. Johnston used the house as his temporary headquarters.

DicksonHouse_071711.jpg

07.11.2011 (G. Kueber)

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SEVEN HEARTHS / WILLIAM REED'S ORDINARY

157
,
Hillsborough
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1754
/ Modified in
1830
,
1877
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Type: 
Use: 

William Reed's Ordinary, also known as Seven Hearths, is an 18th century Federal-style structure on East King St.

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  • Mon, 10/17/2016 - 1:56pm by gary

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157
,
Hillsborough
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1754
/ Modified in
1830
,
1877
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

 

~1900 (History of the Town of Hillsborough)

Via HABS:

The Dr. R.J. Murphy House: The Murphy house is an example of early Piedmont architecture. The main central block of the house was built before 1800, possibly by Barnaby Cabe. The lot belonged to William Reed, high sherifff of Orange and first keeper of the weights and measures. A still house existed on the lower side of the lot in addition to other buildings sited behind the main house. The house itself was twice used as a tavern. An existing west wing of 1 1/2 stories was added before 1820, and a north wing of 2 stories added sometime between 1877 and 1925. The house [was restored] by Dr. and Mrs. Murphy [during the 1960s.]

Addl'l information via the Pelican Guide:

Seven Hearths, a house built on five levels, is an excellent example of Piedmont Architecture. [...] Interesting features include its huge chimneys, reeded mantels, and seven fireplaces. Africa Parker, a freedman, once operated a still house near the western boundary of the lot. The property is sometimes referred to as the 'Stillhouse Lott,' and the stream is called the 'Stillhouse Branch.' A large specimen magnolia now stands near the still house.

1965 (HABS - via LOC)

From the National Register Listing:

This important early landmark is an example of the Federal style, though the core may be a Georgian-era structure. The two-story, side-gabled house is three bays wide and single-pile with beaded weatherboards, boxed eaves, nine-over-nine wood-sash windows on the first floor, and nine-over-six windows on the second floor. The six-panel door is centered on the façade and sheltered by a full-width, shed-roofed porch supported by slender Tuscan columns with a turned railing between the columns. Exterior end brick chimneys flank the main block of the house. The east chimney is laid in a Flemish bond with glazed headers. The west chimney is partially obscured by a c. 1830 1-story side-gabled wing addition which itself has an exterior end chimney laid in one-to-six common bond. The one-story wing has nine-over-nine wood-sash windows with six-light windows flanking the chimney. There is a two-story gabled ell at the right rear (northeast) with an interior brick chimney and an eight-over-eight wood-sash window flanked by four-over-four windows on the right (east) elevation of the first-floor. There is a one-story, shed-roofed porch on the left (west) side of the rear ell and on the rear (north) elevation of the side-gabled wing, each supported by slender square columns.

The main, two-story portion of the house was likely constructed around 1754, with the one-story wing to the west added around 1830 and the two-story rear wing, probably a separate early house, added after 1877. Early owners operated a tavern in the basement rooms with fireplaces and a separate entrance. The attached full width Doric porch is a replacement. The original owner of the lot was William Reed, a town official and tavern keeper, other owners include J.E. Laws (nationally known Register of Deeds) and the writer, Peter Taylor. County tax records date the building to 1754 and a sign in the front yard reads “Wm Reed’s Ordinary c. 1754”. The house is also known as 'Seven Hearths'

1965 (HABS - via LOC)

1965 (HABS - via LOC)

1965 (HABS - via LOC)

From Gardens of Old Hillsborough, 1971:

Mrs. William Hayes had a large flower garden here from 1877 to 1919. At that time, the gate was to the right of the present one, and rock steps led to a porch and east entrance. Under the porch there was a greenhouse, heated by an oilburning stove and lamps, Potted plants stood on the retaining rock wall, and many of these were held over winter in a brick flower pit in the front yard. Sun shining through the glass cover, kept the pit warm in winter. Violets and geraniums bloomed inside and, after Christmas, fragrant freesias.

There is still a branch running through the garden and continuing across the open land in front of the house. This stream, The Still House Branch, formerly serviced a tanyard. The lines of the ditches they used can still be traced.

There was formerly a small house in the garden, which was used by Rev. Mr. Donnely, who was at St. Matthews between 1848 and 1855, while Moses Curtis was in Society Hill.

During the Civil War, the main house was used as a hospital for convalescent soldiers.

Dr. and Mrs. Robert J. Murphy began the work of restoration in 1954, and have developed a particularly colorful and charming terraced garden. There are many interesting old roses, remaining from plantings of long ago.

1966 (Hillsborough, North Carolina General Development Plan, 1968-1988)

1960s - "postcard" retrieved from eBay listing; no original attribution.

06.29.2016 (G. Kueber)

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REGULATOR MARKER

street: ,
Hillsborough
NC
Built in
1963

 

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  • Sat, 08/13/2016 - 6:31pm by gary

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street: ,
Hillsborough
NC
Built in
1963

 

Original marker, circa 1920s

Second marker (postcard excerpt), 1920s

Third Marker, 07.23.2016 (G. Kueber)

Reads:

"On this spot were hanged by order of a Tory Court, June 19, 1771, Merrill, Messer, Matter, Pugh and two other Regulators. Placed by the Durham-Orange Committee, North Carolina Society Colonial Dames in America, April 1963,"

 

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ST. MATTHEW'S EPISCOPAL

210
,
Hillsborough
NC
Built in
1825
/ Modified in
1875
Builders: 
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
,
Local Historic District: 
National Register: 
,
Type: 
Use: 

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  • Sat, 08/13/2016 - 7:59am by gary

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210
,
Hillsborough
NC
Built in
1825
/ Modified in
1875
Builders: 
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
,
Local Historic District: 
National Register: 
,
Type: 
Use: 

 

 

From the National Register nomination:

Sited high on a hill overlooking St. Mary's Road, St. Matthews Episcopal Church is an outstanding example of the early Gothic Revival in North Carolina and is listed individually in the National Register of Historic Places. The three-bay-wide, front-gabled, Flemish-bond brick building has a slate roof and fine lancet windows. The brick detailing includes recessed gothic-arched panels as well as rectangular recessed panels to frame the gothic-arched stained-glass windows. A pyramidal-roofed entrance tower on the west elevation contains an arched entrance with double doors with intricate flat paneling and a molded surround encased in a double row of brick headers. The tower, which was reworked and the spire added in 1875, has a blind gothic- arched panel on the façade and diamond-shaped vents in the slate roof. The chancel, at the east end of the building, is apparently a later addition also. It has a three-part arched window on the rear elevation and six- panel doors with gothic-arched transoms on the side elevations. Modern stone and slate steps access the front entrance and the churchyard is enclosed by a brick wall that extends to St. Mary's Road following the boundaries of the property.

The land on which St. Matthew’s was built was conveyed verbally by Thomas Ruffin around 1820. His deed, dated April 10, 1854, conveyed 1 1/3 acres, but this has been progressively enlarged to accommodate the church, parish house, and a brick-walled cemetery. The church, built between 1825 and 1826, was designed by William Nichols in the Gothic Revival style. He specified the building to be 35' by 45', because "a less width would not be proportionate with the length." The building was constructed by local masons John Berry and Samuel Hancock. Today it stands as a tribute to these fine designers and builders. The church replaced an earlier structure at the northwest corner of North Churton and West Tryon streets that burned in 1793.

07.23.2016 (G. Kueber)

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BELLEVUE / PHILLIPS-HILL-WEBB HOUSE

209
,
Hillsborough
NC
Built in
1800
/ Modified in
1855
Architectural style: 
,
Construction type: 
Local Historic District: 
National Register: 
Type: 
Use: 

James Phillips, a saddler, lived here from 1807 to 1847. His name is scratched on a window in the adjacent kitchen building. In 1853, Thomas Blount Hill purchased the estate and proceeded to enlarge and improve the house. Hill added the western portion consisting of two rooms both upstairs and downstairs and the central tower, renovating the existing house and adding the large porches to create a picturesque Italian villa, which he named BelleVue.

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  • Mon, 10/17/2016 - 12:04pm by gary

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209
,
Hillsborough
NC
Built in
1800
/ Modified in
1855
Architectural style: 
,
Construction type: 
Local Historic District: 
National Register: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

~1960 (History of the Town of HIllsborough)

From the National Register nomination:

Impressively sited on a five-and-a-half-acre lot at the eastern edge of Hillsborough and standing back from the road on a slight hill, this Italianate-style villa was built around an earlier building. The house consists of two two-story, front-gabled sections with a three-story, hip-roofed tower rising between them. It has plain weatherboards, paired four-over-four wood-sash windows, and an interior corbelled brick chimney in each front-gabled wing. The main entrance, centered in the tower, has a fifteen-light French door with ten-light-over- one-panel sidelights and a three-part transom. It is sheltered by a one-story, hip-roofed porch that extends the full width of the façade and wraps around the right (east) and left (west) elevations. The porch is supported by paneled square columns flanked by Corinthian columns and there is a low wood railing with square balusters. There is a low railing at the roofline and a double-leaf door in a shouldered surround at the second-floor level of the tower accesses the porch roof. The third floor of the tower has an eight-light French door flanked by eight- light sidelights that opens to a small balcony supported by braces. The house has been enlarged several times at the rear. There is a two-story gabled wing at the left rear (northwest) with a one-story, front-gabled wing on its left (west) elevation and a one-story, hip-roofed section at the southwest where it connects to the main block. A two-tiered, shed-roofed porch on the right (east) elevation is supported by square columns and the first-floor level has been enclosed with screens. There is a one-story, hip-roofed section at the right rear (northeast).

The house is sited on land that first belonged to James Hogg and was known between 1801 and 1807 as the "school-house lot." Samuel Chinny bought the land in 1799 and probably built the house that is now the eastern portion of the house, since a deed of 1801 mentions a house on the lot, but this is now no longer visible. This building consisted of three large rooms and a hall downstairs and two rooms upstairs. James Phillips, a saddler, lived here from 1807 to 1847. His name is scratched on a window in the adjacent kitchen building. In 1853, Thomas Blount Hill of Halifax County purchased the estate and proceeded to enlarge and improve the house. Hill added the western portion consisting of two rooms both upstairs and downstairs and the central tower, renovating the existing house and adding the large porches to create a picturesque Italian villa, which he named BelleVue. The house was passed to Thomas Blount Hill's daughter, Mary Alice, who married Joseph Cheshire Webb, Sr. and to their son, Joseph Cheshire Webb, Jr. and wife.

1966 (Hillsborough North Carolina General Development Plan 1968-1988)

1966 (Hillsborough North Carolina General Development Plan 1968-1988)

James Phillips Kitchen, c. 1807 - This handsome one-and-a-half-story brick kitchen, located on the east side of BelleVue, is one of the earliest surviving brick structures and one of the finest early kitchens in Hillsborough. It was built by James Phillips around 1807 when he purchased the "School-house lot"; his name is scratched in one of the windows. The two-room, side-gabled kitchen is laid in one-to-five common-bond brick and has exterior end brick chimneys, nine-over-nine wood-sash windows on the east and west elevations, four-light windows in the gables flanking the chimneys, and two six-panel doors on the west elevation, all with flat arches, and a wood shingled roof. The kitchen chimney is ten feet wide at the base with a built-in oven and an arched fireplace. Traces of brick foundations are evident to the north of the kitchen and may have been slave quarters.

07.23.2016 (G. Kueber)

 

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DICKERSON'S CHAPEL AME CHURCH / ORANGE COUNTY COURTHOUSE (THIRD)

102
,
Hillsborough
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1790
/ Modified in
1847
,
1891
,
1947
Construction type: 
,
,
Local Historic District: 
National Register: 
Type: 
Use: 
,

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  • Sun, 08/07/2016 - 3:11pm by gary

Comments

102
,
Hillsborough
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1790
/ Modified in
1847
,
1891
,
1947
Construction type: 
,
,
Local Historic District: 
National Register: 
Type: 
Use: 
,

 

1961 - from History of the Town of Hillsborough

(Below in italics is from the National Register listing; not verified for accuracy by this author.)

Originally constructed in 1790 as the third Orange County Courthouse, this building has been moved and remodeled several times with the current exterior dating to 1947. The front-gabled frame building is five bays deep and has a brick veneer with pointed-arch double-hung stained-glass windows on the right (west) and left (east) elevations. An entrance tower on the façade has a double-leaf four-panel door with pointed-arch stained-glass transom and is accessed by an uncovered concrete stoop with brick detailing and a metal railing. The top of the tower tapers slightly and has pointed-arched louvered vents at the second-floor level and a metal- covered, four-sided steeple. The apse on the rear (south) elevation features a canted bay under a hipped roof. A later, hip-roofed wing projects from the left rear (southeast). In 1845 the former courthouse was purchased by Rev. Elias Dodson and moved to its present site in 1847. The First Baptist Church was formally organized here in 1853. In 1866, it became the property of the Friends of Philadelphia who conveyed the property to the Trustees of the A.M.E. Church of Hillsborough in 1886. The building was remodeled in 1891, and again in 1947 when it was encased in brick.

08.04.2016 (G. Kueber)

 

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WILLIAM WHITTED HOUSE

103
,
Hillsborough
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1786
/ Modified in
1840
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
Local Historic District: 
National Register: 
Type: 
Use: 

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  • Fri, 08/05/2016 - 10:24pm by gary

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103
,
Hillsborough
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1786
/ Modified in
1840
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
Local Historic District: 
National Register: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

1965 (NC State Historic Architecture Research Project Records)

(Below in italics is from the National Register listing; not verified for accuracy by this author.)

This rambling house late eighteenth-century house faces East Queen Street with an ornate c. 1840 Italianate-style addition facing North Churton Street. The earlier two-story structure is two bays wide and single-pile with a massive stone chimney with brick stack in the east gable end. The building has plain weatherboards with flush sheathing under the hip-roofed porch, which is supported by octagonal porch posts with a geometric railing between the posts. It has two-over-two wood-sash windows on the first floor and six- over-six windows at the second-floor level. The four-panel door retains original hardware and six-light-over- one-panel sidelights. The first floor interior retains six-panel doors, raised panel wainscot and one decorative Federal style mantel with reeded pilasters and an egg-and-dart molding.

In the late nineteenth century, a two-story, side-gabled triple-A-roofed wing was added to the left (west) elevation of the original house, perpendicular to the original house and facing North Churton Street. This section of the house is five bays wide and single-pile with weatherboards, two interior corbelled brick chimneys, and four-over-four wood-sash windows with wide segmental-arched Italianate surrounds. The decorative center-bay entrance has double-leaf arched one-light-over-one-panel doors within a round-headed decorative surround similar to those found at the Parks-Richmond House on West King Street. The entrance is sheltered by a single-bay, hip-roofed porch supported by square columns with a wood railing at the roofline and a double-leafed arched door at the second-floor level that opens to the porch roof. There are paired brackets along the roofline and two one-over-one windows with pointed-arch upper sashes in each gable. There is a two- story, hip-roofed porch at the northeast within the ell created by the two wings. The metal-roofed porch has been enclosed at the second-floor level with weatherboards and nine-over-nine windows. The first floor porch is supported by square columns.

The original owner was William Whitted. Noted Kernersville designer Jules Körner, who remodeled the Parks-Richmond House and a number of other houses in Hillsborough, may have been responsible for the Italianate-style addition. Mrs. Eliza Beaty operated a well-known boarding house here in the late nineteenth century and the addition may have been added for her. Early twentieth-century owners were James M. Hedgpeth and Edward M. Harris, and in the 1940s it became the local American Legion Post. It is now a private residence again.

08.04.2016 (G. Kueber)

 

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HEARTSEASE

115
,
Hillborough
NC
Built in
1786
/ Modified in
1810
,
1840
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
Local Historic District: 
National Register: 
Type: 
Use: 

Built by Gov. Thomas Burke (and/or his wife Mary) in 1786, and later the house of Dennis Heartt, owner of the Hillsborough Recorder.

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115
,
Hillborough
NC
Built in
1786
/ Modified in
1810
,
1840
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
Local Historic District: 
National Register: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

Heartsease, ~1890-1900 (History of the Town of Hillsborough)

The main, one-and-a-half-story, Federal-style section of this house is four bays wide and double-pile with beaded weatherboards, three narrow gabled dormers on the façade, and a rubble-stone foundation. Constructed in 1786, the left (west) three bays feature a recessed porch and nine-over-nine wood-sash windows. The right (east) bay, constructed around 1810, has six-over-six wood-sash windows and an exterior, Flemish- bond brick chimney in the gable end. The gabled dormers have plain weatherboards, installed diagonally, and four-over-four wood-sash windows. The six-panel door is sheltered by an inset porch that extends across the original three bays of the façade. There is flush wood sheathing on the façade under the porch, which is supported by Tuscan columns. A two-story, Greek Revival-style wing on the left elevation has a pedimented front-gabled roof with flush sheathing in the gable and a single tripartite, multi-pane window in each story of the narrow façade. Elsewhere in the double-pile wing are nine-over-nine wood-sash windows on the first story and nine-over-six windows on the second. There is a one-to-five common-bond exterior chimney on the left elevation. A shed-roofed wing at the right rear (northeast) has an inset, screened porch. A shed-roofed, screened porch at the rear of the west wing is supported by square posts. There is later stone terracing in the front yard.

The core of the house was constructed about 1786 by Sterling Harris. In 1810, it was purchased by Miss Mary W. Burke, who constructed the right bay. In 1837 the house was sold to the family of Dennis Heartt, who named the house Hearttsease and built the 2-story Greek Revival-style wing about 1840. The Hillsborough Recorder, which Heartt published from 1820 to 1869, was one of the most respected and influential newspapers in the state.

1933 - (Library of Congress / HABS)

 

1965 (Library of Congress / HABS)

1965 (Library of Congress / HABS)

(Hillsborough, North Carolina General Development Plan, 1968-1988)

From Gardens of Old Hillsborough, 1971:

Heartease was built in the late 1700s, tradition says by Governor Thomas Burke for a summer home. It was here that he was captured, early on the morning of September 12, 1781, by the 'Tory Bandit', David Fanning.

The box bushes at the entrance are well over one-hundred years old. Miss Polly Burke, the Governor's daughter, kept school for many years in a little house in the garden. The Seven Sisters Rose growing there has been named "The Polly Burke Rose" in her memory. There is a charming flagstone terrace at the rear, built from foundation stones of the old coach house at Burnside, and a long avenue of boxwood separates the garden areas. Miss Polly finally went to live in Alabama, and sold her home in 1837.

A later owner was Dennis Heartt, editor of the "Hillsborough Recorder," and it was he who gave the place its name. Miss Alice Heartt also had a school in the garden, but there was still room for many flowers, and a small greenhouse under the big elm. Miss Rebecca Wall is the present owner of Heartsease.

2016 (TMLS)

2016 (TMLS)

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WEBB HOUSE

117
,
Hillsborough
NC
Built in
1817
/ Modified in
1837
,
2006
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
Local Historic District: 
National Register: 
Type: 
Use: 

Built around 1800 as a log schoolhouse by Dr. James Webb, and expanded into a full-fledged house in 1837.

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117
,
Hillsborough
NC
Built in
1817
/ Modified in
1837
,
2006
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
Local Historic District: 
National Register: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

1950s (History of the Town of Hillsborough)

(Below in italics is from the National Register listing; not verified for accuracy by this author.)

Constructed around 1817 as a one-room log schoolhouse, this one-and-a-half-story, side-gabled Federal-style house is five bays wide with plain weatherboards and nine-over-one wood-sash windows. The left (west) two bays were likely added later and feature six-over-one wood-sash windows and a shed-roofed dormer. The six-panel door has a molded surround and four-light transom and is sheltered by a two-bay-wide, hip- roofed porch supported by chamfered posts. There are exterior brick chimneys in each gable end, one laid in a Flemish bond, both with freestanding stacks. A two-bay-wide, one-and-a-half-story, side-gabled wing on the left rear (northwest) has plain weatherboards, nine-over-nine windows on the first floor, a six-over-six window in the dormer, and an exterior brick chimney in the left gable. The wing may encompass an earlier kitchen. A gabled ell at the right rear (northeast) features four-over-four wood-sash windows and a fifteen-light French door with twelve-light casement windows and three-light transoms over the doors and windows. Dr. James Webb constructed a one-room log schoolhouse around 1817 and built the present house around the log schoolhouse, which is now the living room, around 1837. The right rear wing was added and the roofline of the left wing was modified in 2006. The lot features mature boxwoods, hardwoods, and a dry-stacked stone retaining wall.

Lucille Dula writes:

The Webb House (1812) was originally a one-room schoolhouse built by Dr. James Webb, a founder of the North Carolina Medical Society. the school was operated by Governor Thomas Burke's Daughter, Mary ("Polly") Burke, for the Webb children and their neighbors. It is believed that she has taught them in her home next door before she opened the school.

From the 1830s until 1983, the house was a private residence for successive generations of Dr. Webb's descendants, with the various families enlarging it to meet their needs. Over the years eight rooms have been added to the original log house, which is now the living room.

The interior, with ceilings that vary from high to low and windows in assorted sizes, is a study in contrasts. The exterior, too, is said to have a 'mind of its own' and refuses to adhere to a specific architectural pattern. However, with its old brick walls, falnked by parallel rows of boxwoods, its well house and old-fashioned garden, this unique frame house is completely at home beside its colonial neighbor, Heartsease."

I rather doubt this was the schoolhouse that Ms. Burke used for instruction; I do believe that structure sat behind Heartsease, and is this structure.

Mr. David Terry, resident of the house in 2016, states: "The log-schoolhouse existed before the house assumed its current form in 1800 and was registered on-deed as a house (rather than an outbuilding of next-door Heartsease, where Polly Burke lived). 1837 would be the date when the back room (formerly a dining room) was added."

08.19.2016 (G. Kueber)

From Gardens of Old Hilllsborough, 1971

The friendly little house looks down its brick walk and seems to say, "Come in." The yard is inviting with trees and shrubs and, on the east side is an old-fashioned well, neatly kept and surrounded with flowers. Mrs. John Graham Webb, the present owner, has rooted much of the boxwood.

We think the house was built in the early 1800s by Dr. James Webb, and that it was a one-room log house. Dr. Webb himself lived next door, while the log house was used as a school, in which Governor Burke's daughter, Miss Mary W. (Polly) Burke caught the Webb children. After the children grew up, the little house was enlarged by Dr. Webb, and used as a residence. Dr. Webb's daughter, who married Dr. Osmond Long, lived there for a while. After they moved away, his son, Thomas Webb, occupied the house and, as the family grew, more rooms were added, until it looked much as it does today. One of the quaint things about the house is the little surprise in the way of stepping up, or stepping down on different levels.

The house has a charm of its own, and is fortunate in being surrounded by beauty on all sides. At the back of the house there is a flagstone terrace, bright with flowers. On a trellis nearby clambers old-fashioned clematis. There are some of the old, much-loved yellow roses like Safrano, Harison's yellow and Lady Hillingdon. Many of the old bulbs find a home here. Among them are jonquils, narcissus, old blue hyacinths, feather hyacinths, pink and white oxalis, and cowslips. Among the shrubs are Persian lilac, spirea, and winter jasmine. Last, but not least, as we turn to go, there stands the boxwood, in dignity and beauty.

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MID-LAWN (WEBB-PATTERSON HOUSE)

131
,
Hillsborough
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1881
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
Local Historic District: 
National Register: 
Type: 
Use: 

Mid-Lawn is a two-story gable-and-wing house prominently sited on the northwest corner of East Queen and North Cameron streets. James Webb Jr. had the house built in 1881, and in 1919 it was sold to David and Elizabeth Patterson.

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  • Sun, 10/09/2016 - 2:14pm by gary

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131
,
Hillsborough
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1881
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
Local Historic District: 
National Register: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

08.19.2016 (G. Kueber)

(Below in italics is from the National Register listing; not verified for accuracy by this author.)

One of the best-preserved Italianate-style houses in Hillsborough, the Webb-Patterson House (Mid- Lawn), is a two-story gable-and-wing house prominently sited on the northwest corner of East Queen and North Cameron streets. The house is three bays wide with a projecting two-story wing on the right (east) end and a two-story, side-gabled wing at the rear (north) that project beyond the right elevation. It has plain weatherboards, two-over-two wood-sash windows, three interior corbelled brick chimneys, and sawn brackets at the roofline. The entrance, centered on the façade, has a double-leaf one-light-over-three-panel door with etched glass. It is sheltered by a one-story, hip-roofed porch that extends across the left two bays of the façade and is supported by chamfered posts with sawn brackets and has a turned balustrade. There is a projecting, bay window on the right end of the façade with flush wood panels above and below the windows and brackets at the roofline. An entrance on the right elevation has a double-leaf two-panel door that is sheltered by a three-bay- wide, hip-roofed porch supported by chamfered posts with sawn brackets. There is a two-story, hip-roofed wing at the rear and a series of one-story additions that connect to an original brick kitchen with six-over-two wood- sash windows and an interior brick chimney. According to the current owner, James Webb Jr. had the house built in 1881, and in 1919 it was sold to David and Elizabeth Patterson. County tax records date the building to 1881. There is a stone wall along the south edge of the property and mature boxwoods line the front walkway. An original barn and servants’ quarters have been lost.

From Gardens of Old Hillsborough, 1971:

There is no tradition that a planned, or formal garden ever existed here but, since the original house of brick was destroyed by fire, it is possible that the garden was also destroyed, or neglected. However, fine magnolia trees and an exceptionally large and beautiful pecan tree remain. There was formerly a large planting of sweet shrub. Old bulbs come up early everywhere. The Madonna Lilies were one of the features of the garden. Mrs. Patterson remembers a stalk bearing twenty-six blooms.

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TURNER-STRUDWICK HOUSE

404
,
Hillsborough
NC
Built in
1833
/ Modified in
1887
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
Local Historic District: 
National Register: 
Type: 
Use: 

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  • Sun, 10/09/2016 - 2:51pm by gary

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404
,
Hillsborough
NC
Built in
1833
/ Modified in
1887
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
Local Historic District: 
National Register: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

08.08.2016 (G. Kueber)

(Below in italics is from the National Register listing; not verified for accuracy by this author.)

The Turner-Strudwick House is a two-story, deck-on-hip-roofed frame house. It is three bays wide and double pile with gables centered on the façade and side elevations. It has plain weatherboards, two-over-two wood-sash windows, and a standing-seam metal roof with two interior corbelled brick chimneys. The double- leaf entrance has a three-light transom and is sheltered by a near-full-width, hip-roofed porch supported by slender classical posts. The entrance is flanked by projecting, three-sided bay windows with wood panels above and below the windows. The windows have beaded surrounds and shutters and there are quatrefoil vents in the gables. There is a one-story, hip-roofed porch on the right (south) gable end supported by the same slender classical posts as the main porch. A one-story rear (east) ell has a low-pitched gable roof, interior brick flue, and full-length, hip-roofed porch supported by plain posts on its south side. A hip-roofed porch, enclosed at the south end, extends across the rest of the rear façade of the main block of the house.

County tax records date the building to 1833 and the house, which appeared on the John L. Bailey Map of 1839, originally occupied a five-acre lot surrounded by Churton, Orange, and Union streets. It was the home of Josiah Turner, Sr., a tinner, and his family. The family went bankrupt in 1872 and the estate was sold at auction. In 1887, it became the property of Edmund Strudwick, a businessman from Norfolk, Virginia. Mr. Strudwick bought the house for his mother and sisters, who lived in the house. Strudwick was responsible for renovating and enlarging the house, apparently adding the roof gables, front bay windows, and replacement sash which give the simple house a Victorian appearance. In 1911, the block was divided into smaller lots for the J.A. Hogan subdivision and the adjacent acreage has been developed with other houses. A small office building, part of the original acreage, is now part of the lot at 408 North Churton Street.

From Gardens of Old Hillsborough, 1971 (I believe this refers to this house):

The William Strudwick house, located on the corner of Churton and East Union Streets, has always been surrounded by informal gardens. As was usual, seventy-five or a hundred years ago, there were flower gardens on each side of the front walk. These gardens held many varieties of old roses. Other flower beds held iris, peonies, dahlias, blue bells, Jacob's Ladder (a species of gladiolus), as well as a variety of flowering shrubs. A grape arbor on the north side occupied a large area. Mr. and Mrs. Brandon Lloyd, the present owners, are enthusiastic gardeners and maintain a beautiful planting of iris and lilies.

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TAMARIND / SHEPPARD STRUDWICK HOUSE

318
,
Hillsborough
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1908
Architect/Designers: 
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
Local Historic District: 
National Register: 
Type: 
Use: 

Sheppard Strudwick, owner of the Bellevue Mill in West Hillsborough, built this house on the former site of the William Bingham house, which he moved east on Union Street. During the 1960s, the owners gave it the name "Tamarind," after the Poe sonnet "To Science."

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318
,
Hillsborough
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1908
Architect/Designers: 
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
Local Historic District: 
National Register: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

08.08.2016 (G. Kueber)

From the National Register Nomination:

This imposing two-story, hip-roofed frame house with its double front porch resembles a plantation house of the type found in the Deep South, with tall casement windows on the first floor that open out to the porch. The five-bay-wide house has plain weatherboards, a standing-seam metal roof with a wide cornice, two interior brick chimneys, six-over-six wood-sash windows, and double-leaf six-light casement windows across the first-floor façade. The entrance, centered on the façade, is a six-panel door with beveled-glass-over-one- panel sidelights and a beveled three-part transom. The two-story, engaged porch is supported by full-height square columns and has a wood railing at the second-floor level and a double-leaf French door centered on the second-floor façade that opens to the second-floor porch. There is a one-story, hip-roofed wing on the right (south) elevation that is flush with the façade. A full-width, one-and-a-half-story, shed-roofed rear wing has three gabled dormers on the rear (east) elevation. There is a one-story, hip-roofed, wing with an exterior brick chimney attached to the left rear (northeast) corner of the house.

The house was built about 1908 from a design by noted ecclesiastical architect Ralph Adams Cram. The brother-in-law of Mrs. Shepperd (Susan) Strudwick, Cram designed the Neoclassical Revival-style house as a recreation of southern charm. As such, it enhances the eclectic streetscape of Churton Street but bears no resemblance to the piedmont vernacular architectural tradition of early Hillsborough. The house was built on the site of the antebellum [c. 1833] W. J. Bingham House, which was moved down East Union Street. Original owner Shepperd Strudwick (1868-1961) was a local industrialist [owner of the Bellevue Mill] his three sons were artists. The John Kennedys, who acquired the house in the 1970s, gave it the name of "Tamarind."

From the Pelican Guide, 1989. pp 26-29:

"In 1950, Walter Carroll, then a staff writer for the Durham Morning Herald, wrote an article appropriately titled - "The Strudwicks - Family of Artists." The Sunday feature told the story of wood carver Shepperd Strudwick and his three sons, portrait painters Clement and Edmund and actor Shepperd Jr.

[...]

Ecclesiastical architect Ralph Adams Cram designed the house. [...] Although the blueprints were altered to make the eventual house more Southern, the classical and turn-of-the-century features that remain make the residence more unusual and artistic. For example, the visitor to Tamarind is aware of the six square wooden columns at the front, but may not notice that the two central ones are farther apart than the remaining four. Such spacing allows the columns to line up with the door and windows without making the hall extremely narror or the flanking rooms unncecessarily wide.

The same precise attention to details is also evident in the roof design. In spite of its unusual structure, the standing-seam metal roof, with each seam separately welded, fits the house compactly and adds strength and unity to the lines of the exterior.

The interior is also a combination of many distinctive features. Here the house blends the formal and informal characterisitcs of an elegant but practical residence. The panelled hall, parlor, and library at the front provide the formal touches, and the back portion, with its adjoining courtyard, adds the living quarters required by a family.

In the beginning, the house was designed for a fireplace or stove in each room, but today there are seven fireplaces, each equipped with brass or wrought-iron andirons. Originally there was a single bathroom, one of Hillsborough's earliest.

When Cram designed the high-ceilinged house, he planned to plaster the ceilings, but the senior Strudwick objected because one of his sisters had been struck by a piece of plaster. Perhaps, too, the woodcarver who fashioned crosses for the Presbyterian and Methodist churches as well as stagecoaches and the Uncle Remus characters preferred the warmer qualities of wood.

Throughout the house there are also many other interesting uses of wood which must have delighted him. There are pine floors in main rooms, oak in the more traveled areas, and all of the downstairs room except a bedroom and the butler's pantry are panelled up to the chair rail. The panelling, designed and installed with exceptional care, varies from dark-stained in the front hall to painted softwoods in other areas. All of the woodwork is custom-made too, except around the doors and windows. To avoid what Strudwick considered an unnecessary expense, this trim is turn-of-the-century instead of classical. The leaded glass in the dining room is also of a later period, and some of the woodwork in the hall appears to be.

[...]

Even in a town noted for its flowers, trees, and shrubs, the plants at Tamarind are unusual. The ancient beech and an undisciplined wisteria vine which measures five feet in circumference are older than the present house. There are also an enomormous crepe myrtle, huge pecans, and an ancient rose with a crown eighteen inches wide. Susan Read Strudwick loved her garden where a circular brick sundial measured the hours [...]. Today a mammoth old magnolia towers above the south upstairs bedroom window, and in the boxwood garden a stone bench has been inscribed with a line from Poe's sonnet 'To Science' : '... the summer dream beneath the Tamarind tree.' Since Shepperd Strudwick Jr. played Edgar Allen Poe in the Hollywood movie of the poet's life, both the line and the name 'Tamarind' are appropriate."

-----

From Gardens of Old Hillsborough, 1971:

The Sheppard Strudwick house, built in 1902, was designed by the noted architect, Ralph Adams Cram. The garden was planned by Mrs. Strudwick, and was her greatest pleasure over a period of many years.

Facing the house on the right, there was a flower bed about twelve feet wide and of good length, in which grew such old favorites as Jacob's Ladder, touch-me-nots, iris, peonies, dahlias, and bluebells. Flowering shrubs found a place here, as well as rose bushes of many varieties. There is still a magnificent old bush of the rose, Silver Moon, and, in the hedge on the south side, climbs a delightful, and now rare, little rose, Félicité et Perpétue.

At the north side, a grape arbor occupied a sizeable area, and there is still a large scuppernong vine growing there, as well as a great Wisteria, which makes a glorious cascade of spring bloom. The large beech tree was planted by Dr. Bingham, founder of the Bingham School. The Methodist Parsonage stood on this lot, when it was purchased by Mr. Strudwick. He had it moved east on Union Street, where it still stands.

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RUFFIN-ROULHAC HOUSE

101
,
Hillsborough
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1821
/ Modified in
1904
,
1972
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
Local Historic District: 
National Register: 
,
Type: 

Owned by many, but named for Thomas Ruffin, who called the house "Little Hawfields" and Mrs. William Roulhac, who renovated and relocated outbuildings. Converted to the town hall for Hillsborough in 1972.

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  • Mon, 10/17/2016 - 2:30pm by gary

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101
,
Hillsborough
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1821
/ Modified in
1904
,
1972
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
Local Historic District: 
National Register: 
,
Type: 

 

Front of the house, ~1900 (History of the Town of Hillsborough)

Back of the house, ~1900 (History of the Town of Hillsborough)

The Ruffin-Roulhac House, also known historically by several names including "Francis C.P. Hill's House," "The old Ruffin place," "Little Hawfields," and the "Home of W.S. Roulhac," is one of the best preserved of the elegant small Federal houses surviving in Hillsborough, which include Heartsease and the Berry Brick House. Additionally, the property is one of a small number of houses in Hillsborough that has retained its large original lot and numerous outbuildings.

The Ruffin-Roulhac House, built about 1821 for Martin Hanks, consisted of the west three bays. In the 1830s Francis L. Hawks and Frances C. P. Blount Hill purchased the house and added the eastern part consisting of two rooms on the first floor and one above incorporating the earlier dwelling into a unified elegant residence. The house was sold to Thomas Ruffin in 1865 who named it "Little Hawfields." Ruffin died in the Northeast room of the house on January 15, 1870 and his wife Anne inherited the estate. Upon her death in 1875 the estate passed to her children and a grandchild. In 1904, the wife of William Sterling Roulhac acquired the estate and made several renovations to the property, including relocating the outbuildings to the rear of the house in a formal straight line.

The house is a one-and-a-half-story frame, Federal-style house that is five bays wide and double-pile with a brick foundation, beaded weatherboards, and nine-over-nine wood-sash windows with molded hoods. There is flush sheathing in the pedimented end gables and three gabled dormers each on the façade and rear (north) elevation have flush sheathing and fixed twelve-light windows. A window on the left (west) elevation has been covered with flush sheathing. The double-leaf three-panel door centered on the façade is flanked by two-over-two wood-sash windows over a fixed panel in lieu of sidelights and has a blind arched transom. The entrance is sheltered by a one-bay-wide, front-gabled porch supported by slender Tuscan columns with decorative, scalloped shingles in the gable and there is flush sheathing under the porch roof. There are two interior brick chimneys in the left (west) gable and an exterior brick chimney in the right (east) gable. A shed- roofed porch extends across the right three bays of the rear elevation. It is supported by round brick columns on low brick piers and there is flush sheathing under the porch roof.

1940 (Library of Congress)

June 9, 1937 (HABS / Library of Congress)

A hip-roofed flower house projecting from the right elevation has brick piers with fixed multi-light windows between the piers and multi-light awning windows at the upper part of the wall. There is a fifteen-light French door and weatherboards on the rear (north) elevation of this wing. A one-story, gabled wing at the right rear (northeast) corner of the house was constructed as a serving room; it stands perpendicular to the house and is connected to a side-gabled kitchen wing via an exterior hip-roofed porch supported by slender columns. Both wings have plain weatherboards, six-over-six wood-sash windows, and modern six-panel doors. There is an interior corbelled brick chimney in the east gable of the kitchen building. There are two small gabled additions on the left elevation, each with weatherboards, flush eaves, and an entrance on the west elevation. The interior of the house is detailed with fine Federal mantels, wainscoting, trim, and an elegant ramped John Berry staircase similar to the one at Sans Souci.

In 1972, the house and property were acquired by the Town of Hillsborough and were renovated for use as the Town Hall and offices.

Congressman L.H. Fountain and Lucius Cheshire discussing the conversion project, late 1960s (Colonial Inn Cookbook)

08.08.2016 (G. Kueber)

07.23.2016 (G. Kueber

 

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SANS SOUCI

237
,
Hillsborough
NC
Built in
1813
/ Modified in
1857
Builders: 
People: 
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
Local Historic District: 
National Register: 
Type: 
Use: 

A c. 1813 house built by William Cain (also of Hardscrabble) and renovated by John Berry in 1857.

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237
,
Hillsborough
NC
Built in
1813
/ Modified in
1857
Builders: 
People: 
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
Local Historic District: 
National Register: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

Carnegie Survey of the Architecture of the South (Library of Congress), 1938

 

From the National Register Nomination"

One of the most elegantly finished Federal style houses in Hillsborough, Sans Souci faces Caine Street to the south but has an East Corbin Street address. The main two-story block is three bays wide and has a side- hall plan. Federal details include a raised basement with Flemish-bond brick, molded weatherboards, and nine- over-nine wood-sash windows with molded surrounds and wide sills. The double-leaf three-panel front door has a five-light transom and is sheltered by a full-width hip-roofed porch supported by square decorative posts and turned balustrade, similar to that at Burnside. The house was enlarged in the mid-nineteenth century with a one- story gabled wing on the left (west) elevation, a one-and-a-half-story gabled wing on the right (east) elevation, and a one-and-a-half-story, shed-roofed wing across the rear (north), all with gabled dormers. The wings have nine-over-nine wood-sash windows on the first-floor level and six-over-six windows in the dormers. The right wing has twelve-over-twelve wood-sash windows in the gable end with six-over-six windows flanking the chimneystack on the east elevation. A basement-level entrance on the east elevation is sheltered by a small shed roof. An entrance on the rear elevation is accessed by an uncovered stair with a Chippendale-style railing. One exterior end chimney stands on the west side of the main block, one stands on the east end of the east wing, and one interior chimney stands between the main block and rear shed addition. There are boxed eaves (except on the dormers) and flush gable ends throughout, brackets at the sides of the front dormers, and operable wood shutters at most of the windows.

The original acreage of Sans Souci was owned by James Hogg and then passed through several owners. Although no registration of title is available, Dr. William Cain evidently built the house circa 1813 for his bride Mary Ruffin. Dr. William Cain’s country house, Hardscrabble, still stands near Hillsborough. The original tract consisted of 30 acres. Dr. Pride Jones, who inherited the estate from Dr. William Cain in 1857, was responsible for the extensive renovations performed by John Berry.

The central block is largely unaltered, with fine early finish. The entrance hall and parlor have elegant mantels with raised paneled overmantels and raised panel wainscot. The dining room has plain wainscot. Interior doors are either six raised panels or five horizontal panel doors. A transom is seen over one of the upstairs doors. The west upstairs bedroom is wallpapered with a blue and white pattern dating from the 1860s.

According to Mrs. Engstrom, local builder John Berry added the rear dining room, rear stairwell, full- width front porch and front 1-story wings in the mid-19th century. The simple Federal style rear staircase, similar to the stairs at the Ruffin-Roulhac house, is characteristic of Berry. Sans Souci is fortunate to have retained many of its outbuildings, including an office, kitchen, and servant’s quarters.

From Gardens of Old Hillsborough, 1971

Charming Sans Souci, built about 1801 by William Cain and his wife, Mary, a sister of Thomas Ruffin, stands on a high spot overlooking the town and surrounding countryside. Of typical Colonial North Carolina architecture, it has a high flight of steps leading to the entrance doorway. At the left of the house stands the old kitchen with its enormous chimney. At the time the first floor bedroom wa added, a tree trunk was used to make a stud for the northeast corner. Much beautiful detail in wainscoting and mantles is found throughout the interior of Sans Souci.

The garden is of interest for its magnificent beeches, hack berries, .cucumber trees, and a large Kentucky Coffee Tree. There is a typical shrubbery of Tree Box, oak leaf hydrangea, and Japonica, and a fine James Grape arbor. The only flowers originally planted bordered the front walk, which was edged with white stones. These were Jacob's Ladder, old purple iris, peonies, white daffodils, snowdrops, and masses of lily-of-the valley. Traces of these plantings can still be seen along the woodland path, which replaced the original walkway.

The Cain family divided its time between the country plantation, "Hard Scrabble," and the Hillsborough home, "Sans Souci," the names representing the difference between life in these two spots. William Cain, Sr. eventually retired to his country plantation, while his son, Dr. William Cain, continued to live at Sans Souci, until his death in 1857. The house then passed to Dr. and Mrs. Pride Jones. Later owners were Bishop Theodore Lyman and Sterling Ruffin. The present owners are Mr. and Mrs. Samuel T. Latta.

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ADAMS HOUSE / BURWELL SCHOOL

319
,
Hillsborough
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1821
/ Modified in
1848
Architectural style: 
,
Construction type: 
Local Historic District: 
National Register: 
,
Type: 
Use: 
,

One of several 'female schools' in 19th century Hillsborough, The Burwell School was enlarged in 1848 from a 1821 dwelling built by William Adams. Reverend Burwell was the pastor of the Presbyterian Church

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  • Sun, 10/09/2016 - 3:25pm by gary

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319
,
Hillsborough
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1821
/ Modified in
1848
Architectural style: 
,
Construction type: 
Local Historic District: 
National Register: 
,
Type: 
Use: 
,

 

Burwell School, undated  - likely early 20th c. (History of the Town of Hillborough 1754-1966)

From the Individual and District National Register nominations:

The oldest portion of the Burwell School was a two-story frame dwelling having a hall and parlor plan built early in the nineteenth century. It measured approximately 18 feet by 24 feet. In 1848 the Reverend Robert Burwell employed Captain John Berry to enlarge the house. Berry was the architect of the Orange County Courthouse in Hillsborough and is known to have enlarged and embellished many houses in the region. Under Berry the house Was given its present central hall plan, the two older rooms lying on one side of the hall and two new ones on the other. This created a new east-west orientation for the buildlng. The resulting principal five-bay facade facing east featured a on one-story shed porch running the full 52 feet. With its moulded weather- boards, green blinds and shed porch the building was far more closely related to older structures than to the then popular Greek Revival mode typified by Berry's Courthouse nearby. In the late nineteenth century the house was remodeled by Jule Gilmer Korner of Kernersville, a noted local artist and designer of the period. Some of Kerner's modifications included a bracket cornice, "gingerbread" porch, a new stair in the hall and several mantels including a marble one in the parlor. At the rear of the house is a picturesque two-room brick kitchen. In the garden an early brick privy has survived.

1971 (National Register nomination)

The Burwell School is sited on a large sloping lot facing North Churton Street at the southwest corner of the intersection with West Union Street. The terraced front lawn with plentiful hardwoods adds to the historic setting. Historically the property is known as lots 152 and 153. The original owner of this property was a local tavern-keeper and businessman named William Adams. Adams built the original structure in 1821 facing West Union Street. It was a two-story house with two rooms on each floor, which are still present today as the south rooms of the Burwell School. In 1836, the property was conveyed to the Trustees of the Presbyterian Church as a manse for the new pastor, Reverend Robert Burwell. In 1837, the Rev. Burwell and his wife, Margaret Anna Robertson Burwell, began a “Female School” in the manse, which remained in operation until 1857. In 1848, the Burwells purchased the house and hired John Berry to add the large north living room and the bedroom above it. In 1857, the Burwells closed the school and the house was occupied briefly by refugees from Edenton during the Civil War. Dr. J. S. Spurgeon purchased the home in 1895 and his family remodeled the home and occupied it until 1965. At that time it was purchased and restored by the Historic Hillsborough Commission, who still own the property.

From Gardens of Old Hillsborough, 1971

Reverend Robert Burwell and his wife, Margaret Anna, conducted their well-known "Female School" here from 1837 to 1857. The gracious old house looks down across a great sweep of green lawn shaded by a magnificent Linden, a great Sugar Maple and a gnarled Osage Orange. The property is in process of restoration by the Historic Hillsborough Commission.

At one time, this was the home of the J. S. Spurgeon family. Mrs. Spurgeon has given us an account of the garden as it was in the early 1900s.

South of the house, running north and south, there was a wide flower border, which separated the lawn in front from the well-kept vegetable garden at the rear. This bed contained old-fashioned everblooming red roses (probably China roses) red peonies, and spring bulbs of many varieties. This was the only flower bed in the garden.

A long gravel walk connected the front of the house with Churton Street. Its outline can still be traced. A cedar rail fence protected the garden along the length of Churton Street, and tall cedars grew at either side of the front gate. Quantities of red tulips and daffodils were planted along the south boundary.

A flower pit was a necessary feature of the old garden. Within its capacious brick walls many ornamental plants were carried over the winter, to be brought out in warm weather to decorate the front of the house. Among these were geraniums, begonias, calla lilies, ferns, and large plumbago plants, grown in wooden tubs. Two citrinas were also carried over in large half-barrels in the pit, their "lemonessence" much appreciated at all seasons.

There were two springs in the garden, one directly at the back of the house fed a small stream, its banks planted to spring bulbs, blooming with the Virginia Bluebells and yellow cowslips. A second spring at the lower side of the vacant, or "lucerne lot" supplied a small marsh, where bull rushes grew and there were masses of Royal Fern.

Several old roses have remained for our pleasure. Particularly interesting is the bush musk rose, undoubtedly of great age, and standing seven feet high. It produces in spring clusters of creamywhite double Bowers, with a characteristic honey-musk fragrance.

Old descriptions of the plantings here are being closely followed in the restoration of the grounds.

 

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PILGRIM'S REST / HASELL-NASH HOUSE

116
,
Hillsborough
NC
Built in
1819
Architect/Designers: 
Architectural style: 
,
Construction type: 
Local Historic District: 
National Register: 
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Type: 
Use: 

The Hasell-Nash house was built around 1820 for Mrs. Eliza Garden Tart Hasell of Charleston and Wilmington. She was the granddaughter of Charleston botanist Dr. Alexander Garden. The house design is similar to Plate 37 of Morris' Rural Architecture

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Last updated

  • Thu, 11/03/2016 - 6:48am by gary

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116
,
Hillsborough
NC
Built in
1819
Architect/Designers: 
Architectural style: 
,
Construction type: 
Local Historic District: 
National Register: 
,
Type: 
Use: 

 

Although associated with the 1965 HABS survey, this picture appears older than the others - likely 1930s from earlier HABS survey, although it is not noted as such. (HABS / Library of Congress)

From the National Register nomination:

One of the most elegant pre-Civil War houses in the district, this tripartite Federal-style house features a two-story, pedimented front-gabled core flanked by one-story, pedimented front-gabled wings. The house is sheathed in plain weatherboards except for the flush sheathing in the pediments. It has nine-over-nine wood- sash windows on the first floor and nine-over-six windows on the second floor. There is an interior brick chimney in the two-story core and a replacement pointed-arch window i