110 N. CHURTON ST.

110 N. CHURTON ST.

110
,
Hillsborough
NC
Built in
1925
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
,
Local Historic District: 
National Register: 
Type: 

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Last updated

  • Wed, 11/02/2016 - 8:34pm by gary

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110
,
Hillsborough
NC
Built in
1925
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
,
Local Historic District: 
National Register: 
Type: 

 

1966 (Hillsborough General Development Plan)

(Below in italics is from the National Register listing; not verified for accuracy by this author.)

This two-story, parapet-roofed Colonial Revival-style commercial building has a running-bond brick veneer and four bays separated by brick pilasters with stepped brick cornices and metal coping at the parapet. The right (south) bay has a fifteen-light French door that accesses a stair to the second-floor level. The left (north) three bays feature a recessed entrance flanked by nine-over-nine wood-sash windows with stone windowsills. The nine-light-over-two-panel door with blind transom is located in a paneled, recessed entrance with a simple pediment on pilasters on the façade. There are twelve-over-twelve wood-sash windows with stone windowsills on the second floor. This building is not on the 1924 Sanborn map, but was likely built in the mid- to late-1920s.

One can get a sense from 1960s planning documents of the push to 'historicize' Hillsborough with fakey pseudocolonial stuff - all very intentional to bolster Hillsborough's identity as this pre-revolutionary town.

1966 proposed renovation of 110 N. Churton to make it "historic."

The bias, of course, is against 20th century history - a sort of "shame that it ain't Williamsburg,"  - itself a mostly fake town. Hillsborough should be "the town that Cornwallis would recognize." Except, of course he wouldn't.

They didn't adopt this whole heinous look for 110 N. Churton, but you can see piece of it in the windows and the door surround.

08.03.2016 (G. Kueber)

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