115 BATTLE LANE / GRAHAM HOUSE / BULRUSHES

115 BATTLE LANE / GRAHAM HOUSE / BULRUSHES

115
,
Chapel Hill
NC
Built in
1908
/ Modified in
2014
Architectural style: 
,
Construction type: 
Local Historic District: 
Type: 

needs more work

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  • Wed, 01/27/2021 - 6:41pm by SteveR

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115
,
Chapel Hill
NC
Built in
1908
/ Modified in
2014
Architectural style: 
,
Construction type: 
Local Historic District: 
Type: 

 

Built in 1908 for Edward Kidder Graham (Graham was a UNC alumnus, taught the University’s first journalism course, and was UNC president from 1914 to 1918 when he died of the flu) and his wife Susan Williams Moses (who died in 1916).
 
Built in the Colonial Revival style with a Craftsman style porch.
 
(Image courtesy Chapel Hill Preservation)
 
Later lodgers included Edward's cousin Frank Porter Graham, Charlie Tillett, and Kemp Battle, and Frank Winslow (all three of whom later were UNC trustees); they rented the second floor.
 
The Graham family moved out in 1914 but continued to own it until 1949.
 
In 1945, the University rented it from the Graham family as a sorority chapter house for Alpha Gamma Delta (Gamma Epsilon Chapter); the sorority nicknamed it "the little brown house." After a 1948 fire in the structure, the University ended its lease.
 
Winter scene (via UNC's 1946 Yackety Yack)
 
Hand drawing (via UNC's 1948 Yackety Yack)
 
 
In 1949 the property was sold by the Graham family to Joseph C. Warren.
 
In 1968, the attic was used in the film Three in the Attic, as an interior location for "Ford Hall" (a fictitious university dormitory).
 
In May 1998 the house was sold by Joseph C. Warren to Sherman Richardson. After decades of extreme neglect, the house was condemned in 2008, with a demolition order being issued by the Chapel Hill Historic District Commission. 
 
Chapel Hill resident Molly Froelich bought the home in 2010 and began restorating the house. The current owner, Martin Lindsey, completed the restoration/renovation.
 
From the Chapel Hill Historic District/National Register of Historic Places nomination form:
"The two-story, cross-gabled, transitional Colonial Revival-Craftsman-style house is three bays wide and double-pile with the right (south) two bays projecting under a front-gabled roof. The house has a shingled exterior, wide two-over-one wood-sash windows on the first floor and two-over-two woodsash windows on the second floor. The one-light-over-two-panel door, centered on the façade, is flanked by two-light-over-two-panel sidelights and sheltered by a two-bay-wide, hip-roofed porch supported by grouped columns on shingled piers. A pedimented gable marks the entrance to the porch. There are projecting one-story hip-roofed bays on the right and left (north) elevations and tripartite two-over-two windows in each gable. A gabled, screened porch at the right rear (southeast) has been recently reconstructed and a two-story, gabled wing at the left rear was also added as part of the 2014 renovation. The house was built in 1908 for professor of English, Edward Kidder Graham, and his wife, Susan Williams Moses [Little]. "
 
June 2019, via Google Streetview

 

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