115 W. KING ST.

115 W. KING ST.

115
,
Hillsborough
NC
Built in
1931
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
,
Local Historic District: 
Type: 

Comments

No comments yet.

Add new comment

In tours

  • This building does not appear in any tours yet.

Last updated

  • Fri, 08/05/2016 - 5:01pm by sevy

Comments

115
,
Hillsborough
NC
Built in
1931
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
,
Local Historic District: 
Type: 

 

07.02.2016 (G. Kueber)

The middle storefront (with the t-shirts and flag) is 115 West King St.

(Below in italics is from the National Register listing; not verified for accuracy by this author.)

The one-story, brick commercial building was erected in two phases and consists of two storefronts. The building has a painted brick exterior with a corbelled brick cornice at the parapet. The left (east) building has terra cotta coping at the parapet and the right (west) building has metal flashing at the parapet. The left storefront has paired one-light wood doors with a two-part transom. The doors are flanked by wood-frame display windows on a low brick knee wall and there is a boarded-up three-part transom that extends the full width of the storefront. The right storefront has a recessed entrance with replacement door with one-light transom. It is flanked by metal-frame display windows and has a boarded-up transom that extends the full width of the storefront. An asphalt-shingled pent roof added c. 1985 extends across both storefronts as well as 117 W. King, rendering both building noncontributing. The building on the left appears on Sanborn maps as a “general store” as early as 1888. In 1931 the building on the right was constructed, the two buildings were connected on the interior, and the left building was modified with a new storefront and façade.

This building is home to Dual Supply - a real life downtown old hardware store.

I truly loathe this awning (pent roof) - the way that it extends across the facades and onto the modern facade of the adjacent 117 W. King with no regard for the inherent architecture is like nails-on-a-chalkboard to me. If a few folks went out one day with a sledgehammer and just took it down, I'd be thrilled. (If it happens, it wasn't me.)

But as with the other buildings on this block, I find the NR nominator's decision to call this building non-contributing because of this baffling - there are copious buildings in other historic districts with superficial facade ugliness that is easily removed that are contributing resources - as this building should be.

Add new comment