PILGRIM'S REST / HASELL-NASH HOUSE

PILGRIM'S REST / HASELL-NASH HOUSE

116
,
Hillsborough
NC
Built in
1819
Architect/Designers: 
Architectural style: 
,
Construction type: 
Local Historic District: 
National Register: 
,
Type: 
Use: 

The Hasell-Nash house was built around 1820 for Mrs. Eliza Garden Tart Hasell of Charleston and Wilmington. She was the granddaughter of Charleston botanist Dr. Alexander Garden. The house design is similar to Plate 37 of Morris' Rural Architecture

Comments

No comments yet.

Add new comment

In tours

Last updated

  • Thu, 11/03/2016 - 6:48am by gary

Comments

116
,
Hillsborough
NC
Built in
1819
Architect/Designers: 
Architectural style: 
,
Construction type: 
Local Historic District: 
National Register: 
,
Type: 
Use: 

 

Although associated with the 1965 HABS survey, this picture appears older than the others - likely 1930s from earlier HABS survey, although it is not noted as such. (HABS / Library of Congress)

From the National Register nomination:

One of the most elegant pre-Civil War houses in the district, this tripartite Federal-style house features a two-story, pedimented front-gabled core flanked by one-story, pedimented front-gabled wings. The house is sheathed in plain weatherboards except for the flush sheathing in the pediments. It has nine-over-nine wood- sash windows on the first floor and nine-over-six windows on the second floor. There is an interior brick chimney in the two-story core and a replacement pointed-arch window in its gable. The double-light door on the right (east) end of the façade has a ten-light transom and is sheltered by a near-full-width, hip-roofed porch supported by Ionic columns. The one-story side wings have nine-over-nine windows flanked by three-over-three windows on the façade and have pointed-arch vents in the pediments. A one-story, side-gabled wing at the right rear (northeast) was completed in 1998 [HDC]. The house is impressively sited, set back from the road with a wide front lawn and a circular walk lined with boxwoods.

February 1965 (HABS / Library of Congress)

February 1965 (HABS / Library of Congress)

February 1965 (HABS / Library of Congress)

Listed individually on the National Register, the Hasell-Nash house was built around 1820 for Mrs. Eliza Garden Tart Hasell of Charleston and Wilmington. She was the granddaughter of Charleston botanist Dr. Alexander Garden. The house design is similar to Plate 37 of Morris' Rural Architecture (London, 1750). The house was sold by Eliza and her new husband, Reverend William S. Plumer, in 1829 to Samuel Simpson of New Bern who bought it for his daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Kollock and Mary Nash. After the deaths of the Nashes in 1897, their unmarried daughter Miss Annie Nash owned the home until 1919. Lieut. Governor A. H. Graham lived here after his own house, Montrose, burned. It was restored by Dr. H. W. Moore, who was assisted by architect Archie Royal Davis, who added the rear wings around 1943. [Moore referred to the house as "Moore's Pleasure," but that didn't stick.] The spelling of the Hasell name was changed to “Hazel” in the mid-twentieth century, but has since been reversed to its historic spelling.The only architectural changes that have occurred at the Hasell-Nash House appear to be the rear extension of the gable wings and the addition of fireplaces to those rooms. Unfortunately none of the original outbuildings remain.

(Hillsborough, North Carolina General Development Plan, 1968-1988)

From Gardens of Old Hillsborough, 1971

This elegant Greek Revival House is thought to have been built about 1820 by Archibald DeBow Murphey, from plate thirty-seven of Robert Morris' Rural Architecture (London, 1750). There is much fine interior panelling to compliment the beauty of its exterior. In the 1820s it was the home of Mrs. Eliza G. Hasell of Wilmington, and later of the Henry K. Nash family for the ninety years from 1829 to 1919. The house and garden were res to red by the present owners, Dr. and Mrs. H. W. Moore in 1943. The well house is a replica of one at Williamsburg.

Several beautiful maples remain from plantings made long ago, and an enormous American Holly. Old climbing roses and Hower borders add color at the back of the garden. At the rear of the immense lot is a large vegetable garden and a Scuppernong grape arbor planted one-hundred-fifty years ago.

09.10.2016 (G. Kueber)

Add new comment