Louis H. Hackney

Louis H. Hackney

Place of birth: 
Chatham County, North Carolina, USA
Date of birth: 
7.1854
Place of death: 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
Date of death: 
12.19.1937

The Rev. Dr. Louis Henry Hackney was born in Chatham County (according to his death certificate) in 1854, and was likely enslaved. His parents were Spencer and Susan/Susie Hackney. The 1870 census shows them living at New Hill, Buckhorn Township, Wake County.

He and Lara A. Edwards were married October 21, 1876. In 1880 they were living in Chapel Hill (Lara was from Chapel Hill and was a Shaw University graduate) and had two young children. His occupation is listed as minister. He was the pastor of the Rock Hill Baptist Church on West Franklin Street by 1890.

Dr. Hackney served as principal of the Quaker school from 1898 to 1912, where he was instrumental in obtaining some county support for the segregated school. In 1913, he and his wife purchased property to the south and started Hackney's Educational and Industrial School, where he was principal and a teacher. The Hackneys lived on the property in the Flanner-Carr House.

In 1916, members of the Chapel Hill School District Board of Directors approached Dr. Hackney about consolidating the school and the local black primary/graded/Quaker school, so Dr. Hackney sold the property (the school and the house) to the school's Board of Trustees, who then sold it to Orange County. The school was then renamed the Orange County Training School in 1917.

Elizabeth Cotton attended Hackney's church in her youth; he tried to dissuade her from playing music, which she did for several years.

Was also: Co-organizer of the New Hope Association, in Chatham County, NC, starting in 1870; co-organizer of the New Hope Sunday School Convention, held in New Hill, NC, starting in 1887; part-time pastor of Cool Springs Sunday School beginning in October 1900; also a noted supporter of the Baptist State Convention and Shaw University.

Dr. Hackney died December 19, 1937, and is buried in the segregated (black) section of the Old Chapel Hill Cemetery.

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