DEATH AND DESTRUCTION

DEATH AND DESTRUCTION


Places where people died, were killed, executed, buried, etc. Also, fires, tornadoes, hurricanes, etc.

GALLOWS HILL

street:
Hillsborough
NC

 

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In tours

Last updated

  • Fri, 12/20/2019 - 1:22pm by SteveR

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street:
Hillsborough
NC

 

“Gallows Hill” was bounded by Nash Street on the north, King Street on the South, Occoneechee Street on the east, and Queen or Union Street on the north. It encompassed town lots 207 through 218. The gallows itself was either located somewhere on lots 207 through 210 or, more likely, it was located on the town commons, just south of Union Street. 
 
These gallows were used from circa 1850 to 1865 for hangings, when the sheriff apparently reverted back to hanging people at the downtown jail. Some executed prisoners were also buried on gallows hill.
 
The “gallows hill” area was developed by Joe Cheshire and H. Winder Webb in the early 1900’s.
 
Excerpt of the 1863 S. T. Alderman map, with "Gallows Hill" outlined in red

 

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BANK OF EFLAND

Efland
NC

don't publish this quite yet! I'm not sure of its exact location

need Forrest Avenue added to the street names list, I think it was located on that street

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Last updated

  • Fri, 12/20/2019 - 1:26pm by SteveR

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Efland
NC

 

The Bank of Efland was chartered in 1920, and organized on September 8, 1920. It opened for business on December 1, 1920.
 
Its president was John L. Efland, and its cashier was Roberts Riley.
 
 
1930
 
It "became insolvent" in 1932 (during the Depression) and its assets were liquidated.
 
 
On November 1, 1930, there was an attempted bank robbery:
 
"In an unsuccessful attempt to rob the Bank of Efland at 10:30 this morning, one robber was killed in a fight with Mr. Carl Forrest, a merchant, and another escaped in a Buick roadster in which he sat in front of the bank. The dead man has been identified as Bruce Carpenter about 26, of Durham. Papers found on him bore this name and address. Efforts were being made this afternoon to make the identification positive. Frustration of the robbery was directly due to an alarm given by Mrs. George Shambley, who started to the bank while the job was in progress. Just as she started to enter the door in the car said to her: 'Lady, you can't go In there now. We're attending to some business in there.' Sensing trouble Mrs. Shambley, instead of standing by the yellow coupe of the ????, went Into the store of Mr. Forrest and said to him: 'Something is wrong over at the bank.' Mr. Forrest remembered that he had loaded a new double-barreled shotgun to shoot a hawk. It was lying nearby. He picked It up and went out toward the bank, about 50 yards away. Mr. Forrest was commanded to halt by the man in the car. He saw in his hands what appeared to be a rifle..."
(From The Elkin Tribune. Elkin, N.C. November 06, 1930)
 
 
 
Bruce Carpenter's 1930 death certificate
 

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OLD HILLSBOROUGH JAIL (FIFTH)

103
,
Hillsborough
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1836
/ Demolished in
c. 1935
Builders: 
Construction type: 
,
Type: 
Use: 

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Last updated

  • Sat, 12/21/2019 - 4:44pm by gary

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103
,
Hillsborough
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1836
/ Demolished in
c. 1935
Builders: 
Construction type: 
,
Type: 
Use: 

 

Circa 1900, view south east (jail indicated by red arrow)

From "History of the Town of Hillsborough 1754-1966," p. 31

Per HotToH:

"In a hundred years Orange County had at last five jails. In 1752, a contract was given to build a jail near Piney Ford. The contract was evidently not carried out. In 1755, Alexander Mebane, Josiah Dixon, and William Churton laid out the first prison in Hillsborough on Lot No. 1. Lot No. 1 was reseved for a market house, courthouse, prison, pillory and stocks.

A second jail was erected about 1765. After the second jail burned, a district jail was built in Hillsborough in 1771. Another district jail was authorized by the legislature in 1798. Building commissioners were appointed for a new prison in 1836, which was to be 45 ft. long, 24 ft. wide, and two stories high. John Berry was awarded the contract for the stone building which was completed in 1837."

The 1798 jail was burned down by a prisoner, Henry Harris, who had been captured without papers (i.e. he likely was a free person of color) some time after possibly taking part in the "Nat Turner Rebellion." He escaped, was recaptured, and was taken to Yanceyville, in nearby Caswell County, and hanged.

According to Federal and State Emergency Relief Administration (ERA) records from 1935, the "old" two-story jail and "town building" (i.e. mayor's office), which was located on the courthouse square (the jail was at the southeast corner of Margaret Lane and Court Street), was "torn down so that a proper setting could be provided for the courthouse. The demolition of the old jail was followed with much interest as it was rumored that the ancient hanging pit would be brought to light--but no trace of it was found. The walls of the old jail, which were thirty-two inches thick, made of flagstone laid in clay, provided the material for all the flagstone sidewalks built on the square."

1888 Sanborn map excerpt

1911 Sanborn map excerpt

Location of the old jail, view west, 07.31.2016 (G. Kueber)

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MARGARET LANE CEMETERY

street: ,
Hillsborough
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1800-1852

 

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In tours

Last updated

  • Thu, 08/18/2016 - 4:59pm by gary

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street: ,
Hillsborough
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1800-1852
Object Type: 

 

07.31.2016 (G. Kueber)

07.31.2016 (G. Kueber)

(Below in italics is from the National Register listing; not verified for accuracy by this author.)

Located on the south side of West Margaret Lane between South Occoneechee and South Hillsborough streets, the cemetery was established as a slave cemetery. It is situated on a small hill with historic hardwoods dotting the otherwise open, grassy parcel. Brick wall mark the corners of the cemetery and form the formal entrance to the cemetery from South Occoneechee Street. Plaques placed in 1987 on a brick wall and a large stone in the center of the cemetery state: "Margaret Lane Cemetery, Before 1852 to 1931” The plaque on the stone also reads “The names of persons found hereon are known to have been buried at this sacred site. Due to varying circumstances, the exact location of most of their graves is not now known. Names subsequently discovered may be placed by town authorization on this plaque or another appropriate marker” and lists the names of forty-one people and dates where known. In addition to the plaque there are also individual markers, the oldest legible marker is for George W. Hill (1844-1900). Only some five stones survive: four headstones and one obelisk, all with dates in the late 19th-early 20th centuries. A small plot at the southwest corner of the cemetery is marked by a Victorian wrought-iron fence.

 

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LOCKHART-PHILLIPS CEMETERY

street:
117
,
Hillsborough
NC
Built in
1792
Construction type: 

 

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In tours

Last updated

  • Sat, 09/03/2016 - 3:32pm by gary

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street:
117
,
Hillsborough
NC
Built in
1792
Object Type: 
Construction type: 

 

08.14.2016 (G. Kueber)

(Below in italics is from the National Register listing; not verified for accuracy by this author.)

A total of seventeen marked graves are found in this small family cemetery enclosed by a stone wall with entrance facing E. Tryon St. Many of the sandstone ledgers and small sandstone headstones are hard to read, but the earliest grave is likely that of Mrs. Catherine Lockhart who died in 1792. Saddler James Phillips probably built the rough-stacked fieldstone wall in 1820; he died 1847 and is also buried here. Phillips was a founder of the Presbyterian Church and of O'Kelly's Christian Chapel. There are five raised tombs with inscribed stones, several low unmarked stones, and a number of headstones that are now leaning against the stone wall. The forty-two feet by forty-two feet cemetery appears on the 1894 Sanborn map.

 

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ORANGE COUNTY POOR HOUSE / COUNTY HOME

Cross street: 
Construction type: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

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Last updated

  • Wed, 10/05/2016 - 8:30pm by gary

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Cross street: 
Construction type: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

 

1891 Tate Map. (LOC)

 

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REGULATOR MARKER

street: ,
Hillsborough
NC
Built in
1963

 

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Last updated

  • Sat, 08/13/2016 - 6:31pm by gary

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street: ,
Hillsborough
NC
Built in
1963
Object Type: 

 

Original marker, circa 1920s

Second marker (postcard excerpt), 1920s

Third Marker, 07.23.2016 (G. Kueber)

Reads:

"On this spot were hanged by order of a Tory Court, June 19, 1771, Merrill, Messer, Matter, Pugh and two other Regulators. Placed by the Durham-Orange Committee, North Carolina Society Colonial Dames in America, April 1963,"

 

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